Career Planning and Placement

Planning and Placement
BEGIN IT. BELIEVE IT. BECOME IT.
Career Center

The Voorhees University Career Center is dedicated to supporting your needs at all stages of the career process. We are here to support you in making decisions about your future direction, acquiring hands-on experiences, or help prepare you for the nest steps to live out your career goals.

Student Services
Exploring Major and Career options and writing your resume, to connecting with employers for internships and interviews. Voorhees University students have access to career coaching and online tools.

Employer Services
Voorhees University has exceptional qualified students and stellar academic programs, our recruiting tools and partner support make it easy to achieve your hiring goals.

Faculty Services
The Voorhees University Career Center welcomes every opportunity to present valuable career management information to your classes. Please schedule a time to visit us, or we will even come to you and your department with custom presentations.

Alumni Services
Numerous services offered to current students are also available to Voorhees University alumni. If you are in the early stages of your career or in the midst of a career change, we can help you reach your next level of success.

Voorhees University Career Connections
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Career Pathways Program Maps

Department of Business and Entrepreneurship
Accounting

Please always check online at catalog or meet with your academic or program advisor to ensure that you are viewing the latest and most accurate information.

CAREER INFORMATION
Accountants have stable and rewarding careers. Accountants play a crucial role in the success of large corporations, small businesses, and government agencies around the world, which translates into consistently high demand and competitive salaries. If you’re considering an accounting career, you will need a strong aptitude for mathematics and analysis, as well as a good business sense and the ability to focus on details. An accounting degree opens the door to many attractive positions, and it can also serve as an important prerequisite for a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) certification and other advanced degrees and certifications.

Accounting ranks high on U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Jobs” List.
Best Business Jobs: #7
Best STEM Jobs: #8
The 100 Best Jobs: #36
Positions in the field
Corporate accountant
Forensic accountant
Corporate controller
Corporate auditor
Corporate tax manager
Corporate compliance analyst
Corporate financial or budget analyst
Financial reporting analyst
Public tax accountant
Public auditor
Job Market Forecast.

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that demand for accountants and auditors will remain strong through 2026, with growth that outpaces other careers in the financial sector and the average for all occupations. To some extent, this growth will be linked to the overall economy. As companies grow and go public, they will need more accounting professionals to handle complex financial documentation. In addition, a trend toward stricter laws, new regulations, and tighter lending standards will drive the need for more accounting and auditing services.
Work environment.

The 1.4 million accounting and auditing professionals in the United States work for an incredibly diverse range of organizations across virtually every industry—from giant public accounting firms and multi-national corporations to government agencies and small businesses. As a result, the hours and types of work environments can vary greatly, depending on the specialty you decide to pursue and the type of firm you work for. Most accountants work in offices, although working from home may also be an option for some. Accounting and auditing work tends to be somewhat solitary, although many accountants are also active members of functional and cross-functional teams. In 2016, about one in five accountants worked more than 40 hours per week, and many accountants are expected to work extra hours during tax season or near the end of their employer’s budget year.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the following industries employed the largest number of accountants in 2016:
Accounting, Tax Preparation, Bookkeeping, and Payroll Services: 353,400
Management of Companies: 94,000
Government: 116,300
Finance and Insurance: 114,500
Professional organizations.
Accounting is a popular career with a robust network of professional organizations. Explore these resources to get a better sense for the profession—and gain valuable insights into whether a bachelor’s degree in accounting is right for you.
American Accounting Association
American Institute of Certified Public Accountants
Accounting and Financial Women’s Alliance
The Association of Accountants and Financial Professionals in Business
International Federation of Accountants
National Association of Black Accountants
National Society of Accountants
Job Search Resources
Are you curious about the latest accounting career job openings? Check out these resources for an up-close look at some of the opportunities that are available today.
Accounting.com
Accounting Jobs Today
2016 Salary Guide: Accounting and Finance
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Voorhees College Career Services
Salary Stats

Thanks to consistently high demand, accountant salariesare rising quickly. In May 2017, the average annual salary for accountants and auditors was $69,350, up from around $60,000 in 2006. Accounting positions also provide excellent opportunities for career advancement and salary growth, with opportunities to move into Financial Management positions and other executive roles.

General Business Administration

Please always check online at catalog or meet with your academic or program advisor to ensure that you are viewing the latest and most accurate information.

CAREER INFORMATION
A Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA) degree is designed to provide students with a strong academic foundation in core business functions including general business administration, accounting, finance, project management, information technology, human resources, marketing, international business, logistics and organizational behavior.
Possible Career Paths with a Business Administration Degree
Sales Managers
Management of Companies and Enterprises
Car Dealers
Wholesale Electronic Markets
Computer Systems Design
Department Stores
Financial Managers
Depository Credit Intermediation
Management of Companies
Accounting, Tax Prep, Bookkeeping and Payroll Services
Insurance Companies
Local Government
HR Management
Management of Companies
Local Government
Hospitals
Employment Services
Computer Systems Design
Marketing Management
Management of Companies
Computer Systems Design
Management, Scientific and Technical Consulting
Insurance Companies
Advertising and Public Relations
Salary Stats
Business Administration Career                         Median Annual Salary*
Sales Management                                                   $117,960
Financial Management                                            $121,750
Human Resources Management                         $106,910
Food Service Management                                    $50,820
Health Care Administration                                   $83,810
Marketing Management                                         $131,180
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ 2018-19 Occupational Outlook Handbook
*The salary information listed is based on a national average, unless noted. Actual salaries may vary greatly based on specialization within the field, location, years of experience and a variety of other factors. National long-term projections of employment growth may not reflect local and/or short-term economic or job conditions and do not guarantee actual job growth.
Job Market Forecast.
The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that demand for employees with a degree in business administration will remain strong through 2026. The latest technology invention becomes old news in approximately two months. Yet businesses will continue to require and use leaders with the right kind of education and training. That’s where a business administration degree may come in handy.
General Business with a Concentration in Finance

Please always check online at catalog at https://www.voorhees.edu/admissions/college-catalog or meet with your academic or program advisor to ensure that you are viewing the latest and most accurate information.
Career Information
In the field of finance, there are three main categories of the industry: public, corporate, and personal. From financial planning to investment banking to insurance, people who pursue careers in finance power the world.
Careers in finance are often a popular choice in that they can offer a high paying position shortly after completing your degree. The different opportunities for working within the finance field are vast, with a multitude of specialties to choose from.
Positions in the field:
Commercial Banking
Investment Banking
Financial Planner
Insurance Agent
Public Accounting
Hedge Fund Manager
Venture Capitalist
Real Estate Agent
Chief Financial Officer
Salaries for Finance Jobs
Professional Organizations:
American Bankruptcy Institute (ABI)
American Finance Association (AFA)
American Association of Bank Directors (AABD)
Association of Finance Professionals (AFP)
Chartered Alternative Investment Analyst (CAIA)
CMT Association
Financial Planning Association (FPA)
Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA)
Institute of Financial Operations (IFO)
National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA)
Professional Risk Managers’ International Association (PRMIA)
Security Traders Association (STA)
Society of Financial Service Professionals (FSP)
Salary Stats
One of the most popular aspects about entering into the finance world is the ability to obtain a job quickly, depending on your degree, and receiving a high-paying salary. Depending on the position within the finance field you choose, your salary will differ. Listed below are some finance jobs and their average salaries:
Finance Job Title           Average Salary
Commercial Banking     $92,983
Investment Banking      $96,543
Financial Planner           $61,830
Insurance Agent            $37,667
Public Accounting         $63,907
Hedge Funds Manager  $70,000
Venture Capitalist         $92,406
Real Estate Agent          $59,180
Chief Financial Officer   $128,468
Business Administration with a Concentration in Small Business and Entrepreneurship

Please always check online at catalog at https://www.voorhees.edu/admissions/college-catalog or meet with your academic or program advisor to ensure that you are viewing the latest and most accurate information.
CAREER INFORMATION
Students who pursue a degree in Business Administration and select the entrepreneurship concentration have a number of career options available to them.  This concentration prepares students with the necessary tools to start their own business as an entrepreneur in a wide variety of fields. Students may wish to begin their career in finance, sales, marketing, or public relations, to name a few options. Some possible choices are listed below:
Business Owner/Founder
Investment Banker
Marketing Manager or Executive
Product Development Manager
Venture Capitalist
Department of Humanities, Education, and Social Sciences
Child Development

Careers for Child Development Graduates
THE undergraduate degree in child development have several career options within both public and private institutions. Among the options upon graduation and optional certification are:
Child Development Family Advocate
Early Childhood Teacher
Early Childhood Consultant
Child Life Specialist
Parent Educator
Child Development Paraprofessional
Head Start teaching or leadership positions
Pre-school education jobs
Daycare education and management positions
Nanning and private daycare services
Curriculum specialist
Child development educator or specialist
Job Outlook
Childcare Workers
Percent change in employment, projected 2018-28
Other personal care and service workers
22%
Total, all occupations
5%
Childcare workers
2%
Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program
Employment of childcare workers is projected to grow 2 percent from 2018 to 2028, slower than the average for all occupations.
Parents or guardians who work will continue to need the assistance of childcare workers. In addition, the demand for preschools and childcare facilities, and consequently childcare workers, should remain strong because early childhood education is widely recognized as important for a child’s intellectual and emotional development.
However, the increasing cost of childcare may reduce demand for childcare workers.
Job Prospects
Despite limited employment growth, about 177,900 openings for childcare workers are projected each year, on average, over the decade.
Most of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who exit the labor force, such as to retire, and from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations.
Workers who attain the Child Development Associate credential should have the best job prospects.

Pay
Childcare Workers
Median hourly wages, May 2018
Total, all occupations
$18.58
Other personal care and service workers
$11.70
Childcare workers
$11.17
Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics
The median hourly wage for childcare workers was $11.17 in May 2018. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $8.53, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $16.55.
In May 2018, the median hourly wages for childcare workers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Pay varies with the worker’s education level and work setting. Those in formal childcare settings and those with more education usually earn higher wages. Pay for self-employed workers is based on the number of hours they work and the number and ages of children in their care.
Childcare workers’ schedules vary, and part-time work is common.
Childcare centers usually are open year round, with long hours so that parents or guardians can drop off and pick up their children before and after work. Some centers employ full-time and part-time staff with staggered shifts to cover the entire day.
Family childcare providers may work long or irregular hours to fit parents’ work schedules. In some cases, these childcare providers may offer evening and overnight care to meet the needs of families. After the children go home, childcare providers often have more responsibilities, such as shopping for food or supplies, keeping records, and cleaning.
Nannies work either full or part time. Full-time nannies may work more than 40 hours a week to cover parents’ commuting time to and from work
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/personal-care-and-service/childcare-workers.htm#tab-5
Kindergarten and Elementary School Teachers
Job Outlook
Kindergarten and Elementary School Teachers
Percent change in employment, projected 2018-28
Total, all occupations
5%
Preschool, primary, secondary, and special education school teachers
4%
Kindergarten teachers, except special education
4%
Kindergarten and elementary school teachers
3%
Elementary school teachers, except special education
3%
Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program
Overall employment of kindergarten and elementary school teachers is projected to grow 3 percent from 2018 to 2028, slower than the average for all occupations. Rising student enrollment should increase demand for kindergarten and elementary teachers, but employment growth will vary by region.
The number of students enrolling in public kindergarten and elementary schools is expected to increase over the coming decade, and the number of classes needed to accommodate these students should rise. As a result, more teachers will be needed to teach public kindergarten and elementary school students.
Despite expected increases in enrollment in public schools, employment growth for kindergarten and elementary school teachers will depend on state and local government budgets. If state and local governments experience budget deficits, they may lay off employees, including teachers. As a result, employment growth of public kindergarten and elementary school teachers may be somewhat reduced.
Job Prospects
Some teachers are expected to reach retirement age over the coming decade. Their retirements may increase the need to replace workers who leave the occupation.
Opportunities will vary by region and school setting. There will be better opportunities in urban and rural school districts than in suburban school districts. Flexibility in job location may increase prospects.

Kindergarten and Elementary School Teachers
Median annual wages, May 2018
Elementary school teachers, except special education
$58,230
Kindergarten and elementary school teachers
$57,980
Preschool, primary, secondary, and special education school teachers
$56,790
Kindergarten teachers, except special education
$55,470
Total, all occupations
$38,640
Note: All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy.
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics
The median annual wage for elementary school teachers, except special education was $58,230 in May 2018. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $37,780, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $95,270.
The median annual wage for kindergarten teachers, except special education was $55,470 in May 2018. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $35,680, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $86,310.
In May 2018, the median annual wages for elementary school teachers, except special education in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

In May 2018, the median annual wages for kindergarten teachers, except special education in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Kindergarten and elementary school teachers generally work during school hours when students are present. They may meet with parents, students, and other teachers before and after school. They often spend time in the evenings and on weekends grading papers and preparing lessons.
Many kindergarten and elementary school teachers work the traditional 10-month school year and have a 2-month break during the summer. They also have a short midwinter break. Some teachers work during the summer.
Teachers in districts with a year-round schedule typically work 9 weeks in a row and then have a break for 3 weeks before starting a new school session.
Professional/ College Student Organizations
Early Childhood Membership Associations
Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI)
ACEI is a global community of educators and advocates who unite knowledge, experience, and perspectives in order to exchange information, explore innovation, and advocate for children. The Association promotes and supports the optimal education and development of children, from birth through early adolescence, and the professional growth of educators and others committed to the needs of children in a changing society.
Child Care Aware of America
Child Care Aware is the national network of more than 700 child care resource and referral centers located in every state and most communities across the U.S. These centers help families, child care providers, and communities find, provide, and plan for affordable, quality child care.
Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), Division for Early Childhood (DEC)
CEC is an international organization dedicated to improving educational outcomes for individuals with exceptionalities, students with disabilities, and/or those who are gifted. DEC is the Division of CEC that focuses on young children (birth through age 8) who have or are at risk for developmental delays and disabilities.
HighScope Educational Research Foundation
HighScope is an independent nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, established in 1970 with headquarters in Ypsilanti, Michigan. HighScope works to create and deliver high-quality educational resources, including professional learning workshops, assessment instruments, curriculum materials, and evaluation services to improve educational outcomes for children, families and communities. HighScope publishes many resources that support early childhood educators in their continued learning about best practices and the latest research in the early childhood field and by taking advantage of all the benefits of the HighScope Membership Association teachers interested in the CDA Credential will receive a wide variety of high quality early educational resources that benefit teachers, administrators, students, parents, and advocates who work to create positive lifetime benefits for children, families and communities.
Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC)
The Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC) is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit, world-wide organization. A model of positive leadership and advocacy, the MCEC’s work is focused on ensuring quality educational opportunities for all military-connected children affected by mobility, family separation, and transition. The MCEC performs research, develops resources, conducts professional institutes and conferences, and publishes resources for all constituencies.
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)
NAEYC is dedicated to improving the well-being of all young children, with particular focus on the quality of educational and developmental services for all children from birth through age 8. The Association administers a voluntary, national accreditation system for high-quality early childhood programs, sponsors a variety of initiatives to improve professional preparation of early childhood educators, and produces a wide array of early childhood resources. NAEYC membership provides participation in both national and local services through the Association’s network of over 300 local, state, and regional Affiliates.
National Association for Family Child Care (NAFCC)
NAFCC is dedicated to promoting quality child care by strengthening the profession of family child care. NAFCC provides technical assistance to family child care associations by promoting leadership development and by promoting quality and professionalism through the organization’s accreditation process for family child care providers.
National Black Child Development Institute (NBCDI)
NBCDI provides and supports programs, workshops, and resources for African American children, their parents and communities in early health and education, health, elementary and secondary education, child welfare, and parenting. Affiliate chapters in many regions of the country provide direct services at the community level.
National Head Start Association (NHSA)
NHSA is dedicated to meeting the needs of Head Start children and their families. The Association provides support for the Head Start community by advocating for policies to strengthen Head Start services; providing training and professional development to Head Start staff; and developing and disseminating research, information, and resources that enrich Head Start program delivery.
World Organization for Early Childhood Education-United States National Committee (OMEP-USNC)
OMEP is the only worldwide non-governmental organization that focuses on education and welfare of young children, aged from birth to 8. OMEP assists any undertaking to improve early childhood education, and supports scientific research that can influence these conditions. The USNC works to educate its members and the public about issues relating to young children throughout the world.
ZERO TO THREE
ZERO TO THREE’s mission is to support the healthy development and well-being of infants, toddlers and their families. This multidisciplinary organization advances its mission by informing, educating, and supporting adults who influence the lives of infants and toddlers.
Research and Information Links for Early Childhood Career
National Institute for Early Education Research:  http://nieer.org/
National Association for the Education of Young Children:       https://www.naeyc.org/resources/topics/research
Benefits of Early Childhood Education
https://www.ffyf.org/new-harvard-study-reveals-lasting-benefits-quality-early-childhood-education/
Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice
The goals of the Criminal Justice major are to:
Prepare graduates to meet the demands of the 21st century in the field of Criminal Justice, by making sure students are aware of the issues, concepts, philosophies and theories in criminal justice through quality instruction by continuing to strengthen teaching and student learning in the major.
Prepare students to pursue advanced studies or a career in Criminal Justice and/or related professions such as Public Administration, Political Science, Sociology, and Law.
Program Student Learning Outcomes:
Demonstrate knowledge of current issues, concepts, philosophies and theories in the field of Criminal Justice;
Write a research paper using electronic and non-electronic sources with appropriate documentation;
Demonstrate the ability to speak as well as write cogently, effectively, and suitably as it relates to various subject matter;
Demonstrate a commitment to community service; and
Apply knowledge of ethical principles to the high standards expected of criminal justice practitioners, as well as, demonstrate values that promote self-worth, harmonious behavior and interaction, selfreliance, empathy, and tolerance for others.
A Major in Criminal Justice Requires:
General Education 44
Social Science Core 24
Criminal Justice Core 37
Selected Track Electives 15
TOTAL 120
Students are eligible for Certificate in Criminal Justice upon completion of 32 CJ credit hours.
Track III Certificate in Emergency Management embedded in EM courses.
Criminal Justice Tracks
Select One
Track I: Law Enforcement
(15 hrs)
PSY 230 General Psychology
CJ 431 Private Security
CJ 435 Criminal Procedures
SOCJ 435 Deviant Behavior
EM 101 Intro. to Emerg Mang
Track II: Criminology
(15 hrs.)
PSY 230 General sychology
SOCJ 435 Deviant Behavior
SOC 432 Social Problems
SOC 335 The Family
SOC 337 Racial & Ethnic Rel
Track III: Emergency Management
(15 hrs.)
EM 101 Intro. to Emerg Mang
EM 201 Risk and Vulnerability
EM 301 Emergency Planning
EM 360 Terrorism in the Mod Wr
PSY XXX Environmental Psy
Interdisciplinary Studies

Psychology

Job Market Forecast
The psychologist job outlook is expected to be stronger than the average over the next decade, which is perhaps why psychology has become one of the most popular majors at universities throughout the United States, ranking in the top five degrees awarded at many schools. The U.S. Department of Labor predicts that the demand for psychologists will grow at a rate of 14 percent over the next decade, which is faster than the average for all careers. Between 2016 and 2026, an estimated 23,000 psychologist jobs will be added to the U.S. economy.
Work environment
Career options utilize communication, interpersonal, and human behavior knowledge that psychology majors acquire during their undergraduate studies.

Professional/College student Organizations
American Psychology Association
Association of Educational Therapists
Psi Chi
National Association of African-American Psychologist
Career information
Career options utilize communication, interpersonal, and human behavior knowledge that psychology majors acquire during their undergraduate studies.
Psychologist (Educational, Industrial Organizational, Sport, Forensic, Experimental)
Psychometrist/Clinician
Substance Abuse Counselor
Sales Representatives
Advertising Agents
Psychiatric Technicians
Counselors
Probation and Parole Officer
Market Researcher
Teacher
Sociology

Department of Science, Technology, Health and Human Services
Biology Degree Pre-Med Track

*Substitute for Developmental Psychology for Physical Therapy
NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY
The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.
COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION
Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.
Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.
Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.
Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.
Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.
Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.
Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.
Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences
Essential Information

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Medical doctors examine, diagnose and treat patients. They can specialize in a number of medical areas, such as pediatrics, anesthesiology or cardiology, or they can work as general practice physicians. Becoming a medical doctor requires earning a doctoral degree in medicine and participating in clinical rotations. It’s also common for medical school graduates to enroll in a residency program to study a specialty. Medical doctors need state licensure, and certification may also be required for some specialists.
Job Description
Medical doctors (M.D.s) diagnose patient conditions using examinations and tests. Based on their findings, they prescribe treatment and medications to attempt to heal any illnesses or injuries. General practitioners and pediatricians have a wide range of medical knowledge, and they are often the first types of doctors who patients visit. Most doctors routinely work in teams, with nurses and aides assisting them in well-lit work locations.
Workplace
Doctors may work long and unpredictable hours dictated by the needs of their patients. Additionally, doctors may need to travel amongst various locations, such as offices, hospitals and clinics, in order to provide patient care. Doctors who practice in healthcare organizations or groups have less work independence but may obtain more time off as a result of patient coverage.
Job Options
M.D.s are sometimes referred to as allopathic physicians. As needed, medical doctors might refer patients to specialists who focus on specific medical areas, such as anesthesiology, cardiology, psychology and internal medicine. Specialists are experts in their field and complete additional residency training, and become board certified in their specialty.
Career Information
From 2014 to 2024, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected job opportunities for physicians and surgeons to increase by 14%, much faster than that of most other occupations, as existing doctors retire and a growing population demands more medical services. Low-income and rural areas were projected to have an especially high demand for doctors. Cardiologists and radiologists might find particularly strong career opportunities due to a rising elderly population and increase in the risk of cancer and heart disease.
Salary Information
Income for medical doctors varies significantly based on their amount of experience and area of specialty. For example, the BLS reported, as of May 2015, family and general practice doctors earned an average annual salary of $192,120; meanwhile, anesthesiologists averaged $258,100 per year.
A medical doctor treats and cares for patient’s health. The job requires a medical degree and a state license to practice medicine.

Career and labor market research tools
See Quick Reference Guide at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/, O*NET: https://www.onetonline.org/
Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.
Career Services Link:
https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu
Career Services Phonel: (803) 780-1074
Biology Pre-Pharmacy Track

*Substitute for Developmental Psychology for Physical Therapy
NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY
The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.
COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION
Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.
Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.
Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.
Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.
Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.
Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.
Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.
Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences
Essential Information

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Medical doctors examine, diagnose and treat patients. They can specialize in a number of medical areas, such as pediatrics, anesthesiology or cardiology, or they can work as general practice physicians. Becoming a medical doctor requires earning a doctoral degree in medicine and participating in clinical rotations. It’s also common for medical school graduates to enroll in a residency program to study a specialty. Medical doctors need state licensure, and certification may also be required for some specialists.
Job Description
Medical doctors (M.D.s) diagnose patient conditions using examinations and tests. Based on their findings, they prescribe treatment and medications to attempt to heal any illnesses or injuries. General practitioners and pediatricians have a wide range of medical knowledge, and they are often the first types of doctors who patients visit. Most doctors routinely work in teams, with nurses and aides assisting them in well-lit work locations.
Workplace
Doctors may work long and unpredictable hours dictated by the needs of their patients. Additionally, doctors may need to travel amongst various locations, such as offices, hospitals and clinics, in order to provide patient care. Doctors who practice in healthcare organizations or groups have less work independence but may obtain more time off as a result of patient coverage.
Job Options
M.D.s are sometimes referred to as allopathic physicians. As needed, medical doctors might refer patients to specialists who focus on specific medical areas, such as anesthesiology, cardiology, psychology and internal medicine. Specialists are experts in their field and complete additional residency training, and become board certified in their specialty.
Career Information
From 2014 to 2024, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected job opportunities for physicians and surgeons to increase by 14%, much faster than that of most other occupations, as existing doctors retire and a growing population demands more medical services. Low-income and rural areas were projected to have an especially high demand for doctors. Cardiologists and radiologists might find particularly strong career opportunities due to a rising elderly population and increase in the risk of cancer and heart disease.
Salary Information
Income for medical doctors varies significantly based on their amount of experience and area of specialty. For example, the BLS reported, as of May 2015, family and general practice doctors earned an average annual salary of $192,120; meanwhile, anesthesiologists averaged $258,100 per year.
A medical doctor treats and cares for patient’s health. The job requires a medical degree and a state license to practice medicine.

Career and labor market research tools
See Quick Reference Guide at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/, O*NET: https://www.onetonline.org/

Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.
Career Services Link:
https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu
Career Services Phone: (803) 780-1074
Biology Pre-Dental

*Substitute for Developmental Psychology for Physical Therapy
NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY
The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.
COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION
Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.
Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.
Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.
Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.
Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.
Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.
Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.
Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences
Essential Information

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Medical doctors examine, diagnose and treat patients. They can specialize in a number of medical areas, such as pediatrics, anesthesiology or cardiology, or they can work as general practice physicians. Becoming a medical doctor requires earning a doctoral degree in medicine and participating in clinical rotations. It’s also common for medical school graduates to enroll in a residency program to study a specialty. Medical doctors need state licensure, and certification may also be required for some specialists.
Job Description
Medical doctors (M.D.s) diagnose patient conditions using examinations and tests. Based on their findings, they prescribe treatment and medications to attempt to heal any illnesses or injuries. General practitioners and pediatricians have a wide range of medical knowledge, and they are often the first types of doctors who patients visit. Most doctors routinely work in teams, with nurses and aides assisting them in well-lit work locations.
Workplace
Doctors may work long and unpredictable hours dictated by the needs of their patients. Additionally, doctors may need to travel amongst various locations, such as offices, hospitals and clinics, in order to provide patient care. Doctors who practice in healthcare organizations or groups have less work independence but may obtain more time off as a result of patient coverage.
Job Options
M.D.s are sometimes referred to as allopathic physicians. As needed, medical doctors might refer patients to specialists who focus on specific medical areas, such as anesthesiology, cardiology, psychology and internal medicine. Specialists are experts in their field and complete additional residency training, and become board certified in their specialty.
Career Information
From 2014 to 2024, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected job opportunities for physicians and surgeons to increase by 14%, much faster than that of most other occupations, as existing doctors retire and a growing population demands more medical services. Low-income and rural areas were projected to have an especially high demand for doctors. Cardiologists and radiologists might find particularly strong career opportunities due to a rising elderly population and increase in the risk of cancer and heart disease.
Salary Information
Income for medical doctors varies significantly based on their amount of experience and area of specialty. For example, the BLS reported, as of May 2015, family and general practice doctors earned an average annual salary of $192,120; meanwhile, anesthesiologists averaged $258,100 per year.
A medical doctor treats and cares for patient’s health. The job requires a medical degree and a state license to practice medicine.

Career and labor market research tools
See Quick Reference Guide at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/, O*NET: https://www.onetonline.org/
Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.
Career Services Link:
https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu
Career Services Phone: (803) 780-1074
Biology Pre-Physical Therapy

*Substitute for Developmental Psychology for Physical Therapy
NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY
The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.
COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION
Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.
Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.
Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.
Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.
Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.
Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.
Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.
Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences
Essential Information

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Medical doctors examine, diagnose and treat patients. They can specialize in a number of medical areas, such as pediatrics, anesthesiology or cardiology, or they can work as general practice physicians. Becoming a medical doctor requires earning a doctoral degree in medicine and participating in clinical rotations. It’s also common for medical school graduates to enroll in a residency program to study a specialty. Medical doctors need state licensure, and certification may also be required for some specialists.
Job Description
Medical doctors (M.D.s) diagnose patient conditions using examinations and tests. Based on their findings, they prescribe treatment and medications to attempt to heal any illnesses or injuries. General practitioners and pediatricians have a wide range of medical knowledge, and they are often the first types of doctors who patients visit. Most doctors routinely work in teams, with nurses and aides assisting them in well-lit work locations.
Workplace
Doctors may work long and unpredictable hours dictated by the needs of their patients. Additionally, doctors may need to travel amongst various locations, such as offices, hospitals and clinics, in order to provide patient care. Doctors who practice in healthcare organizations or groups have less work independence but may obtain more time off as a result of patient coverage.
Job Options
M.D.s are sometimes referred to as allopathic physicians. As needed, medical doctors might refer patients to specialists who focus on specific medical areas, such as anesthesiology, cardiology, psychology and internal medicine. Specialists are experts in their field and complete additional residency training, and become board certified in their specialty.
Career Information
From 2014 to 2024, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected job opportunities for physicians and surgeons to increase by 14%, much faster than that of most other occupations, as existing doctors retire and a growing population demands more medical services. Low-income and rural areas were projected to have an especially high demand for doctors. Cardiologists and radiologists might find particularly strong career opportunities due to a rising elderly population and increase in the risk of cancer and heart disease.
Salary Information
Income for medical doctors varies significantly based on their amount of experience and area of specialty. For example, the BLS reported, as of May 2015, family and general practice doctors earned an average annual salary of $192,120; meanwhile, anesthesiologists averaged $258,100 per year.
A medical doctor treats and cares for patient’s health. The job requires a medical degree and a state license to practice medicine.
Career and labor market research tools
See Quick Reference Guide at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/, O*NET: https://www.onetonline.org/
Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.
Career Services Link:
https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu
Career Services Phonel: (803) 780-1074
Sports Management Coaching Track

Questions and Notes
Not enough courses to make a track, contingent upon the new courses listed below being offered

NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY
The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.
COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION
Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.
Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.
Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.
Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.
Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.
Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.
Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.
Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences
Sports Coaching and Instructors Career Track Essential Job Information
The specific job requirements of sports instructors and coaches varies according to the type of sport and athletes involved. For example, an instructor teaching advanced skiing at a resort in Utah will have different duties and responsibilities than an instructor teaching beginning swimming at a municipal pool. Nevertheless, all instructors and coaches are teachers. They must be very knowledgeable about rules and strategies for their respective sports. They must also have an effective teaching method that reinforces correct techniques and procedures so their students or players will be able to gain from that valuable knowledge. Also, instructors and coaches need to be aware of and open to new procedures and techniques. Many attend clinics or seminars to learn more about their sport or even how to teach more effectively. Many are also members of professional organizations that deal exclusively with their sport.
Safety is a primary concern for all coaches and instructors. Coaches and instructors make sure their students have the right equipment and know its correct use. A major component of safety is helping students feel comfortable and confident with their abilities. This entails teaching the proper stances, techniques, and movements of a game, instructing students on basic rules, and answering any questions.
While instructors may tutor students individually or in small groups, a coach works with all the members of a team. Both use lectures and demonstrations to show students the proper skills, and both point out students’ mistakes or deficiencies.
Motivation is another key element in sports instruction. Almost all sports require stamina, and most coaches will tell you that psychological preparation is every bit as important as physical training.
Coaches and instructors also have administrative responsibilities. College coaches actively recruit new players to join their team. Professional coaches attend team meetings with owners and general managers to determine which players they will draft the next season. Sports instructors at health and athletic clubs schedule classes, lessons, and contests.
Sports Coaching and Instructor Career Requirements
Training and educational requirements vary, depending on the specific sport and the ability level of students being instructed. Most coaches who are associated with schools have bachelor’s degrees. Many middle and high school coaches are also teachers within the school. Most instructors need to combine several years of successful experience in a particular sport with some educational background, preferably in teaching. A college degree is becoming more important as part of an instructor’s background.
High School
To prepare for college courses, high school students should take courses that teach human physiology. Biology, health, and exercise classes would all be helpful. Courses in English and speech are also important to improve or develop communication skills.
There is no substitute for developing expertise in a sport. If you can play the sport well and effectively explain to other people how they might play, you will most likely be able to get a job as a sports instructor. The most significant source of training for this occupation is gained while on the job.
Postsecondary Training
Postsecondary training in this field varies greatly. College and professional coaches often attended college as athletes, while others attended college and received their degrees without playing a sport. If you are interested in becoming a high school coach, you will need a college degree because you will most likely be teaching as well as coaching. At the high school level, coaches spend their days teaching everything from physical education to English to mathematics, and so the college courses these coaches take vary greatly. Coaches of some youth league sports may not need a postsecondary degree, but they must have a solid understanding of their sport and of injury prevention.
Certification or Licensing
Many facilities require sports instructors to be certified. Information on certification is available from any organization that deals with the specific sport in which one might be interested.
Since most high school coaches also work as teachers, those interested in this job should plan to obtain teacher certification in their state.
Other Requirements
Coaches have to be experts in their sport. They must have complete knowledge of the rules and strategies of the game, so that they can creatively design effective plays and techniques for their athletes. But the requirements for this job do not end here. Good coaches are able to communicate their extensive knowledge to the athletes in a way that not only instructs the athletes, but also inspires them to perform to their fullest potential. Therefore, coaches are also teachers.
“I think I’m good at my job because I love working with people and because I’m disciplined in everything I do,” says Dawn Shannahan, former assistant girls’ basketball and track coach at Leyden High School in Franklin Park, Illinois. Discipline is important for athletes, as they must practice plays and techniques over and over again. Coaches who cannot demonstrate and encourage this type of discipline will have difficulty helping their athletes improve. Shannahan adds, “I’ve seen coaches who are really knowledgeable about their sport but who aren’t patient enough to allow for mistakes or for learning.” Patience can make all the difference between an effective coach and one who is unsuccessful.
Similarly, Shannahan says, “A coach shouldn’t be a pessimist. The team could be losing by a lot, but you have to stay optimistic and encourage the players.” Coaches must be able to work under pressure, guiding teams through games and tournaments that carry great personal and possibly financial stakes for everyone involved.
Exploring Sport Coaching and Instructors Careers
Try to gain as much experience as possible in all sports and a specific sport in particular. It is never too early to start. High school and college offer great opportunities to participate in sporting events either as a player, manager, trainer, or in intramural leagues.
Most communities have sports programs such as Little League baseball or track and field meets sponsored by the recreation commission. Get involved by volunteering as a coach, umpire, or starter.
Talking with sports instructors already working in the field is also a good way to discover specific job information and find out about career opportunities.
Employers
Besides working in high schools, coaches are hired by colleges and universities, professional sports teams, individual athletes such as tennis players, and by youth leagues, summer camps, and recreation centers.
Starting Out
People with expertise in a particular sport, who are interested in becoming an instructor, should apply directly to the appropriate facility. Sometimes a facility will provide training.
For those interested in coaching, many colleges offer positions to graduate assistant coaches. Graduate assistant coaches are recently graduated players who are interested in becoming coaches. They receive a stipend and gain valuable coaching experience.

Advancement
Advancement opportunities for both instructors and coaches depend on the individual’s skills, willingness to learn, and work ethic. A sports coach’s / instructor’s success can be measured by caliber of play and number of students. Successful instructors may become well known enough to open their own schools or camps, write books, or produce how-to videos.
Some would argue that a high percentage of wins is the only criteria for success for professional coaches. However, coaches in the scholastic ranks have other responsibilities and other factors that measure success; for example, high school and college coaches must make sure their players are getting good grades. All coaches must try to produce a team that competes in a sportsmanlike fashion regardless of whether they win or lose.
Successful coaches are often hired by larger schools. High school coaches may advance to become college coaches, and the most successful college coaches often are given the opportunity to coach professional teams. Former players sometimes land assistant or head coaching positions.
Earnings
Earnings for sports instructors and coaches vary considerably depending on the sport and the person or team being coached. The coach of a Wimbledon champion commands much more money per hour than the swimming instructor for the tadpole class at the municipal pool.
The U.S. Department of Labor reports that the median earnings for sports coaches and instructors were $25,990 in 2005. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $13,650, while the highest 10 percent earned more than $56,400. Sports instructors and coaches who worked at colleges and universities earned a median annual salary of $41,910 in 2005, while those employed by elementary and secondary schools earned $27,380.
Much of the work is part time, and part-time employees generally do not receive paid vacations, sick days, or health insurance. Instructors who teach group classes for beginners through park districts or at city recreation centers can expect to earn around $6 per hour. An hour long individual lesson through a golf course or tennis club averages $75. Many times, coaches for children’s teams work as volunteers.
Many sports instructors work in camps teaching swimming, archery, sailing and other activities. These instructors generally earn between $1,000 and $2,500, plus room and board, for a summer session.
Full-time fitness instructors at gyms or health clubs can expect to earn between $17,380 and $40,030 per year, with a median salary of $25,470. Instructors with many years of experience and a college degree have the highest earning potential.
Most coaches who work at the high school level or below also teach within the school district. Besides their teaching salary and coaching fee—either a flat rate or a percentage of their annual salary—school coaches receive a benefits package that includes paid vacations and health insurance.
College head football coaches generally earn an average of $75,000, although top coaches can earn as much as $2 million per year. Head coaches of men’s college basketball teams’ average about $70,000 annually, while coaches of women’s teams average considerable less at $42,000 a year. Many larger universities pay more. Coaches for professional teams often earn between $125,000 and $500,000. Some top coaches can command million-dollar- salaries. Many popular coaches augment their salaries with personal appearances and endorsements.
Work Environment
An instructor or coach may work indoors, in a gym or health club, or outdoors, perhaps at a swimming pool. Much of the work is part time. Full-time sports instructors generally work between 35 and 40 hours per week.
During the season when their teams compete, coaches can work 16 hours each day, five or six days each week. It is not unusual for coaches or instructors to work evenings or weekends. Instructors work then because that is when their adult students are available for instruction. Coaches work nights and weekends because those are the times their teams compete.
One significant drawback to this job is the lack of job security. A club may hire a new instructor on very little notice, or may cancel a scheduled class for lack of interest. Athletic teams routinely fire coaches after losing seasons.
Sports instructors and coaches should enjoy working with a wide variety of people. They should be able to communicate clearly and possess good leadership skills to effectively teach complex skills. They can take pride in the knowledge that they have helped their students or their players reach new heights of achievement and training.
Sports Instructor and Coach Career Outlook
Americans’ interest in health, physical fitness, and body image continues to send people to gyms and playing fields. This fitness boom has created strong employment opportunities for many people in sports-related occupations.
Health clubs, community centers, parks and recreational facilities, and private business now employ sports instructors who teach everything from tennis and golf to scuba diving.
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, this occupation will grow about as fast as the average through 2014. Job opportunities will be best in high schools and in amateur athletic leagues. Health clubs, adult education programs, and private industry will require competent, dedicated instructors. Those with the most training, education, and experience will have the best chance for employment.
The creation of new professional leagues, as well as the expansion of current leagues will open some new employment opportunities for professional coaches, but competition for these jobs will be very intense. There will also be openings as other coaches retire, or are terminated. However, there is very little job security in coaching, unless a coach can consistently produce a winning team.
Career Information References
American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD)
American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA)
National High School Athletic Coaches Association
North American Society for Sport Management
Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.
Career Services Link:
https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu
Career Services Phone: (803) 780-1074
Additional Career Service Links:
http://www.ncaa.org/about/coaching-associations
http://www.sportscareersinstitute.com/sports-jobs-sites.html
https://www.teamworkonline.com/
https://www.sportscareerfinder.com/members/sports-links/k-12-sports-resources/
http://www.sportscareers.com/
https://www.jobsinsports.com/
https://www.workinsports.com/
Sports Management Pre-Physical Therapy Track

*Substitute for Developmental Psychology for Physical Therapy
NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY
The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.
COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION
Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.
Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.
Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.
Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.
Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.
Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.
Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.
Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences
Essential Information

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Medical doctors examine, diagnose and treat patients. They can specialize in a number of medical areas, such as pediatrics, anesthesiology or cardiology, or they can work as general practice physicians. Becoming a medical doctor requires earning a doctoral degree in medicine and participating in clinical rotations. It’s also common for medical school graduates to enroll in a residency program to study a specialty. Medical doctors need state licensure, and certification may also be required for some specialists.
Job Description
Medical doctors (M.D.s) diagnose patient conditions using examinations and tests. Based on their findings, they prescribe treatment and medications to attempt to heal any illnesses or injuries. General practitioners and pediatricians have a wide range of medical knowledge, and they are often the first types of doctors who patients visit. Most doctors routinely work in teams, with nurses and aides assisting them in well-lit work locations.
Workplace
Doctors may work long and unpredictable hours dictated by the needs of their patients. Additionally, doctors may need to travel amongst various locations, such as offices, hospitals and clinics, in order to provide patient care. Doctors who practice in healthcare organizations or groups have less work independence but may obtain more time off as a result of patient coverage.
Job Options
M.D.s are sometimes referred to as allopathic physicians. As needed, medical doctors might refer patients to specialists who focus on specific medical areas, such as anesthesiology, cardiology, psychology and internal medicine. Specialists are experts in their field and complete additional residency training, and become board certified in their specialty.
Career Information
From 2014 to 2024, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected job opportunities for physicians and surgeons to increase by 14%, much faster than that of most other occupations, as existing doctors retire and a growing population demands more medical services. Low-income and rural areas were projected to have an especially high demand for doctors. Cardiologists and radiologists might find particularly strong career opportunities due to a rising elderly population and increase in the risk of cancer and heart disease.
Salary Information
Income for medical doctors varies significantly based on their amount of experience and area of specialty. For example, the BLS reported, as of May 2015, family and general practice doctors earned an average annual salary of $192,120; meanwhile, anesthesiologists averaged $258,100 per year.
A medical doctor treats and cares for patient’s health. The job requires a medical degree and a state license to practice medicine.

Career and labor market research tools
See Quick Reference Guide at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/, O*NET: https://www.onetonline.org/

Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.
Career Services Link:
https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu
Career Services Phonel: (803) 780-1074
Sports Management Sports Psychology Track

NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY
The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.
COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION
Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.
Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.
Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.
Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.
Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.
Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.
Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.
Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences

Sport Psychology Career Track Essential Job Information
Sports psychology is a combination of several disciplines within psychology and sports science. Aspiring graduates can take various pathways in their education as well as in their career. Employment opportunities in sports psychology may involve counseling/therapy, teaching, coaching, research, and others. While a bachelor’s degree in sports psychology (or a double major in psychology and a sports-related subject) may open some employment opportunities, most entry-level and higher jobs in this field require a graduate degree.
A clinical and sport psychologist studies the interaction between psychological factors and performance in sports. Jess, the psychologist in the video works with athletes who have eating disorders.

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Career Options
Clinical Sports Psychologist
Clinical Sports Psychologists typically counsel athletes facing personal and career crises such as anxiety, performance issues, behavior modification and mental responses to physical injuries.
Applied Sports Psychologist
Applied Sports Psychologists instruct individual athletes and sports teams on the various methods of mental conditioning, including visualization, concentration and relaxation techniques. Many sports psychologists work onsite with sports teams alongside coaches, trainers and managers. Others practice independently and perform consulting services on an as-needed basis.
Career Information
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median salary for psychologists, all other, including sports psychologists, is $94,590 per year in May 2015. The employment rate for all psychologists is expected to increase by 19% between 2014 and 2024, which is actually the national average for all careers (www.bls.gov).
Salaries vary based on the psychologist’s area of specialization and experience, the employing organization and the amount of advanced training received. Experienced psychologists working for professional sports teams or professional athletes may earn six-figure salaries, while those working in educational or research settings receive more modest salaries.
Jobs in the field of sports psychology:
Applied Sports Psychologist. …
Clinical Sports Psychologist. …
Sports Rehabilitation Therapist. …
Sports Research Specialist. …
University Team Coach. …
Professional Team Coach. …
Sports Psychology Professor. …
High School Teacher.
The BLS reports that the job outlook is best for sports psychologists with a doctoral degree in their specialty. Positions for potential psychologists with master’s degrees are limited and candidates may face intense competition for the available jobs. Sports psychologists with master’s degrees may expect to work as assistant counselors or in research positions, directly supervised by licensed psychologists. Time spent volunteering with sports teams or interning under the supervision of sport and exercise psychology professionals may also be helpful in obtaining full-time positions.
Education Requirements
Entry-level positions for licensed sports psychologists typically require a master’s or doctorate degree in clinical psychology, sports psychology or counseling. Very few schools currently offer full sports and exercise psychology programs at the undergraduate or graduate level. Undergraduate students may consider pursuing double majors in psychology and exercise science, or a major in one discipline with a minor in the second.
Graduate and post-graduate students typically complete advanced coursework in exercise science, kinesiology and clinical psychology. A one-year internship through a program approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) may be an additional requirement for graduation. Continuing education and training is available through several professional organizations, including the APA and the Association for Applied Sport Psychology, once state licensing or certification as a psychologist is obtained.
To summarize, sports psychologists combine a passion for psychology and sports to conduct research and apply findings to the mental and emotional betterment of athletes. These professionals require extensive knowledge and training that usually results in the acquisition of a doctoral degree.
Career Links / References
Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook
Explore Careers, Labor Market Information, Government of Canada
Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP)
http://www.ncaa.org/about/coaching-associations
http://www.sportscareersinstitute.com/sports-jobs-sites.html
https://www.teamworkonline.com/
https://www.sportscareerfinder.com/members/sports-links/k-12-sports-resources/
http://www.sportscareers.com/
https://www.jobsinsports.com/
https://www.workinsports.com/
Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.
Career Services Link:
https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu
Career Services Phone: (803) 780-1074
Professional Psychology Associations
American Psychiatric Association
American Psychological Association
American for Psychological Science
APA Division 38
APA Division 47
Psychological Societies on the Internet
Sport Associations
British Olympic Association
International Olympic Committee
National Collegiate Athletics Association
National Alliance for Youth Sports
Collegiate Strength and Conditioning Coaches Association
North American Society for Sport Management
Public Health Pre-Medicine Track

NACE CAREER READINESS COMPETENCIES – KEY
The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has defined career readiness as the “attainment and demonstration of requisite competencies that broadly prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” This definition was comprised by experts in both the fields of higher education and corporate workplaces. The following will list the descriptions of each number that will correspond to the competencies you will be able to focus on in career center programming and internships.
COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION
Critical Thinking/Problem Solving: Exercise sound reasoning to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. The individual is able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data in this process, and may demonstrate originality and inventiveness.
Oral/Written Communications: Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively in written and oral forms to persons inside and outside of the organization. The individual has public speaking skills; is able to express ideas to others; and can write/edit memos, letters, and complex technical reports clearly and effectively.
Teamwork/Collaboration: Build collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints. The individual is able to work within a team structure, and can negotiate and manage conflict.
Digital Technology: Leverage existing digital technologies ethically and efficiently to solve problems, complete tasks and accomplish goals. The individual demonstrates effective adaptability to new and emerging technologies.
Leadership: Leverage the strengths of others to achieve common goals, and use interpersonal skills to coach and develop others. The individual is able to assess and manage his/her emotions and those of others; use of empathetic skills to guide and motivate; and organize, prioritize, and delegate work.
Professionalism/Work Ethic: Demonstrate personal accountability and effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, and time workload management, and understand the impact of nonverbal communication on professional work image. The individual demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior, acts responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind, and is able to learn from his/her mistakes.
Career Management: Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths, knowledge, and experiences relevant to the position desired and career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth. The individual is able to navigate and explore job options, understands and can take the steps necessary to pursue opportunities, and understands how to self-advocate for opportunities in the workplace.
Global/Intercultural: Fluency Value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, and religions. The individual demonstrates openness, inclusiveness, sensitivity, and the ability to interact respectfully with all people and understand individuals’ differences
Essential Information

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Medical doctors examine, diagnose and treat patients. They can specialize in a number of medical areas, such as pediatrics, anesthesiology or cardiology, or they can work as general practice physicians. Becoming a medical doctor requires earning a doctoral degree in medicine and participating in clinical rotations. It’s also common for medical school graduates to enroll in a residency program to study a specialty. Medical doctors need state licensure, and certification may also be required for some specialists.
Job Description
Medical doctors (M.D.s) diagnose patient conditions using examinations and tests. Based on their findings, they prescribe treatment and medications to attempt to heal any illnesses or injuries. General practitioners and pediatricians have a wide range of medical knowledge, and they are often the first types of doctors who patients visit. Most doctors routinely work in teams, with nurses and aides assisting them in well-lit work locations.
Workplace
Doctors may work long and unpredictable hours dictated by the needs of their patients. Additionally, doctors may need to travel amongst various locations, such as offices, hospitals and clinics, in order to provide patient care. Doctors who practice in healthcare organizations or groups have less work independence but may obtain more time off as a result of patient coverage.
Job Options
M.D.s are sometimes referred to as allopathic physicians. As needed, medical doctors might refer patients to specialists who focus on specific medical areas, such as anesthesiology, cardiology, psychology and internal medicine. Specialists are experts in their field and complete additional residency training, and become board certified in their specialty.
Career Information
From 2014 to 2024, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected job opportunities for physicians and surgeons to increase by 14%, much faster than that of most other occupations, as existing doctors retire and a growing population demands more medical services. Low-income and rural areas were projected to have an especially high demand for doctors. Cardiologists and radiologists might find particularly strong career opportunities due to a rising elderly population and increase in the risk of cancer and heart disease.
Salary Information
Income for medical doctors varies significantly based on their amount of experience and area of specialty. For example, the BLS reported, as of May 2015, family and general practice doctors earned an average annual salary of $192,120; meanwhile, anesthesiologists averaged $258,100 per year.
A medical doctor treats and cares for patient’s health. The job requires a medical degree and a state license to practice medicine.
Career and labor market research tools
See Quick Reference Guide at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Bureau of Labor Statistics: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/, O*NET: https://www.onetonline.org/
Career Resources: VC’s career services website provides information on career exploration and employment at https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Students are encouraged to consult with their area of study advisor for additional career assistance. The above information is provided as a guide and reference tool for occupations related to this program. This is not a guarantee of job placement in any of these occupations after successful completion of an VC program. The common job titles listed are representative titles and are provided for career research. These are not the only occupations possible in this area of study.
Career Services Link: https://app.purplebriefcase.com/pb/account/login?s=Voorhees
Career Services Email:vccareerscpi@voorhees.edu
Career Services Phone: (803) 780-1074

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